Tag: 上海龙凤论坛三通


Real Estate Opportunities touted during Premiers Sales Investment Blitz


first_img Record number of stars set to shine says TCHTA Related Items:chicago, new york city, premier’s sales blitz, turks and caicos hotel and tourism association, virgin hotel Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Tourism Pitch In Houston Impresses 45 Year Travel Agent New York Dancers share talent in TCI Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 21 May 2015 – Make the Turks and Caicos your home; the appeal last night in Chicago at the Virgin Hotel by Premier Rufus Ewing as attention went beyond pitching tourism and vacations but real estate and investment. The Premier said the country’s best beach and best island destination in the world prizes are worth boasting but there is also a strong economy with the country securing a triple B plus rating from Standard & Poor in 2014. The Turks and Caicos Real Estate Association is among those represented on the six city tour, which has now tackled four major US cities namely: Atlanta, Houston, Dallas and Chicago. Braving the 40° temperatures, travel agents turned out strong last night and remained impressed by the 12-minute video feature produced by Caya Hico Media. The delegation next journeys to New York City where likely the largest turnout will appear for a roof top luxury promotional event will be held at the celebrated Knickerbocker Hotel. last_img read more


BSE closes points 2955 up on Feb 24


first_imgBSE closes points 29.55 up on Feb 245.6K views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00BSE closes points 29.55 up on Feb 245.6K viewsBusinessNew Delhi, Feb 24 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 29.55 points up to stand at 29,004.66. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 7.15 points up to stand at 8,761.25. RELIGARE and KSCL were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 6.09% and 5.91% along with PMCFIN and ADANI ENTERPRISES LTD with an increase of 4.94% and 4.85% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include TVSMOTOR and PIPAVAVDOC with a decrease of 6.95% and 5.54% along with JINDAL STEEL and ALSTOM T&D INDIA LTD. with a decrease of 5.16% and 4.50% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 43.46 points at 19,653.53 while the banking sector is down 22.37 points at 21,639.66 and the reality sector is up at 9.77 points at 1,751.60. The Indian currency is up 0.03 % at Rs 62.30 per dollar.Ventuno Web Player 4.50New Delhi, Feb 24 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 29.55 points up to stand at 29,004.66. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 7.15 points up to stand at 8,761.25. RELIGARE and KSCL were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 6.09% and 5.91% along with PMCFIN and ADANI ENTERPRISES LTD with an increase of 4.94% and 4.85% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include TVSMOTOR and PIPAVAVDOC with a decrease of 6.95% and 5.54% along with JINDAL STEEL and ALSTOM T&D INDIA LTD. with a decrease of 5.16% and 4.50% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 43.46 points at 19,653.53 while the banking sector is down 22.37 points at 21,639.66 and the reality sector is up at 9.77 points at 1,751.60. The Indian currency is up 0.03 % at Rs 62.30 per dollar.last_img read more


Myanmar army uses fake photos to malign Rohingyas Reuters


first_imgA combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Flickr depicting the bodies of Bengalis being retrieved following their massacre in Dhaka in 1971. The same image (bottom) as it appears in the Myanmar army`s recently published book on the Rohingya describing it as the brutal killing of the local ethnic people by Bengalis in Myanmar. Photo: ReutersMyanmar’s army has used a photo of Bangladesh’s liberation war in a new book to cover their ethnic riots in the 1940s, reveals a Reuters exclusive report.The photo of the killing of the Bengalis (Bangladeshis) by the Pakistani forces was claimed to be the image of murder of Buddhists by Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority the Myanmar army refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants, according to the report.Reuters’ examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during the 1971 independence war of Bangladesh, a country that has given shelter to more than one million Rohingyas who fled Myanmar’s ethnic cleansing.Another photo in the book was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country, Reuters’ investigation found.Such fake photos were “sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit”, reads the Reuters report.In the 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I”, the army has tried to establish its own narrative of August 2017 crackdown, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh. Mass killings, rape, and arson were reported later on.The full report of the Reuters, filed with Yongon dateline, is given below:The grainy black-and-white photo, printed in a new book on the Rohingya crisis authored by Myanmar’s army, shows a man standing over two bodies, wielding a farming tool. “Bengalis killed local ethnics brutally”, reads the caption.The photo appears in a section of the book covering ethnic riots in Myanmar in the 1940s. The text says the image shows Buddhists murdered by Rohingya – members of a Muslim minority the book refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants.But a Reuters examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during Bangladesh’s 1971 independence war, when hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis were killed by Pakistani troops.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from the Pulitzer Prize website depicting the migration of Rwandan Hutu refugees in 1996 following violence in Rwanda. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, converted to black-and-white, describing the people as Bengalis entering the country following the British colonial occupation of lower Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIt is one of three images that appear in the book, published in July by the army’s department of public relations and psychological warfare, that have been misrepresented as archival pictures from the western state of Rakhine.In fact, Reuters found that two of the photos originally were taken in Bangladesh and Tanzania. A third was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country.Government spokesman Zaw Htay and a military spokesman could not be reached for comment on the authenticity of the images. U Myo Myint Maung, permanent secretary at the information ministry, declined to comment, saying he had not read the book.The 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I” relates the army’s narrative of August last year, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh, according to United Nations agencies, triggering reports of mass killings, rape, and arson. Tatmadaw is the official name of Myanmar’s military.Much of the content is sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit, which since the start of the crisis has distributed news giving the army’s perspective, mostly via Facebook.The book is on sale at bookstores across the commercial capital of Yangon. A member of staff at Innwa, one of the biggest bookshops in the city, said the 50 copies the store ordered had sold out, but there was no plan to order more. “Not many people came looking for it,” said the bookseller, who declined to be named.On Monday, Facebook banned the army chief and other military officials accused of using the platform to “inflame ethnic and religious tensions”. The same day, UN investigators accused Senior General Min Aung Hlaing of overseeing a campaign with “genocidal intent” and recommended he and other senior officials be prosecuted for crimes against humanity.In its new book, the military denies the allegations of abuses, blaming the violence on “Bengali terrorists” it says were intent on carving out a Rohingya state named “Arkistan”.Attacks allegedly by Rohingya militants calling themselves the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army preceded the military’s crackdown in August 2017 in Rakhine state, in which the UN investigators say 10,000 people may have been killed. The group denies it has separatist aims.The book also seeks to trace the history of the Rohingya – who regard themselves as native to western Myanmar – casting them as interlopers from Bangladesh.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Getty Images depicting Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants, who were trying to flee Myanmar, after their boat was seized by MyanmarÕs navy, near Yangon, in 2015. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, flipped and converted to black-and-white, describing Bengalis entering Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIn the introduction to the book the writer, listed as Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Kyaw Oo, says the text was compiled using “documentary photos” with the aim of “revealing the history of Bengalis”.“It can be found that whenever a political change or an ethnic armed conflict occurred in Myanmar those Bengalis take it as an opportunity,” the book reads, arguing that Muslims took advantage of the uncertainty of Myanmar’s nascent democratic transition to ignite “religious clashes”.Reuters was unable to contact Kyaw Kyaw Oo for comment.Reuters examined some of the photographs using Google Reverse Image Search and TinEye, tools commonly used by news organizations and others to identify images that have previously appeared online. Checks were then made with the previously credited publishers to establish the origins of those images.Of the 80 images in the book, most were recent pictures of army chief Min Aung Hlaing meeting foreign dignitaries or local officials visiting Rakhine. Several were screengrabs from videos posted by Rohingya militant group the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army.Of eight photos presented as historical images, Reuters found the provenance of three to be faked and was unable to determine the provenance of the five others.One faded black-and-white image shows a crowd of men who appear to be on a long march with their backs bent over. “Bengalis intruded into the country after the British Colonialism occupied the lower part of Myanmar,” the caption reads.The photo is apparently intended to depict Rohingya arriving in Myanmar during the colonial era, which ended in 1948. Reuters determined the picture is in fact a distorted version of a color image taken in 1996 of refugees fleeing the genocide in Rwanda. The photographer, Martha Rial, working for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won the Pulitzer Prize.The newspaper did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the use of its photo.Another picture, also printed in black-and-white, shows men aboard a rickety boat. “Bengalis entered Myanmar via the watercourse,” the caption reads.Actually, the original photo depicts Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants leaving Myanmar in 2015, when tens of thousands fled for Thailand and Malaysia. The original has been rotated and blurred so the photo looks granular. It was sourced from Myanmar’s own information ministry.last_img

Impressions that linger on


first_imgKorean Culture Centre has organised an exhibition titled Hanji Impression that  introduces ‘hanji’ to India by Korean and Indian artists Park Yeo-Sang and Sharmi Chowdhury that commenced on January 15. Hanji literally means ‘the paper of Korea’. The main material is the fibrous skin of the mulberry.Hanji is not simply paper. It is used in a variety of ways, and has a different name according to its use. Both the artists uses Hanji as the base for their artistic interpretations.  Even with changing times and the dominance of smart phones and digital culture, nothing can completely replace paper. As a medium of expressing emotions, the artists hope that hanji undergoes a transformation at the hands of the artists to become a valuable piece of artist. As a part of exhibition, workshops on Hanji making, Hanji book making and Hanji calendar making also took place. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Taking a look back at the history of mankind, one can say that the invention of paper marked the beginning of civilization. It is on paper that letters and characters were carved and books written and this material has been a source of progress for man. Through the invention of paper, man was able to leave behind wonderful works of art instead of leaving artistic imprints only in caves. Korea’s traditional hanji boasts a history of over a thousand years. The world’s oldest book printed with a metallic printing type was printed on hanji. This book was published in the 14th century and has been preserved for over 600 years in its paper form to exhibit the high preservation quality of hanji. The hanji that is produced traditionally and the type that is machine-produced both have a soft and warm quality. Hanji has the unique feature of being able to transmit the emotive qualities and thus provides attraction to today’s artists.When: On till February 5 Where: Exhibition Hall, Korean Cultural CentreTiming: 10 am – 5 pmlast_img read more


11 Tips to Secure Mobile Devices and Client Data


first_img You have employees. They bring smartphones to work. All is fine, right? Wrong.Related: Meet the Cybersecurity Startup That’s Caught the Eye of Google’s Eric Schmidt First of all, the second an employee brings a personal mobile device to work, you can bet on a fusion of personal and business affairs occurring. This was evident when 2,000 office workers were surveyed as to:How many downloaded personal apps to tablets issued by their employer: 73 percentHow many did this with smartphones their company issued: 62 percentHow many did it with company-issued notebooks: 45 percentThe age group most guilty of this: 25 to 38 years oldThe number who used their smartphones and other mobile units to conduct company business: over 50 percentThat last percentage was slightly better news. But it hardly canceled out the aforementioned misuse, which may result in who-knows-how-much company business leaking outside the building to who knows where. That “50 percent” also raises the question: Have you, a decision-maker at your company, devised any plans to prevent or minimize how much company data leaves your building, in the form of storage inside your employees’ smartphones and other mobile devices?The solutions may lie in the strategies that company decision-makers and IT managers can draw on to control data leakage. These strategies fall under something called enterprise mobile management. But cooperation is required from both parties: the company and the employees.As a decision-maker, then, you’d be smart to think: “We’ll just never know, will we, where an employee’s smartphone ends up on the weekends — a device loaded with our most sensitive data!”Solutions for businessesBusiness owners and other company decision-makers should regard the personal smartphone as a potential company diary. You don’t want this diary going all over the place after hours. You don’t want it easily opened for all to see what’s written on the pages.Related: 4 Essentials to Secure Your Business Even From State-Sponsored Online ThreatsSo, try consider these strategies:1. Teach employees about phishing scams.Phishing maneuvers are a leading way that cybercriminals steal data. Research shows how easy it is to get employees to fall for these scams: The worker receives an email that has an urgency to it (e.g., subject line: “Get back to me asap”). Inside the mail is a link that the sender urges the recipient to click on. The link takes the user to a fake website that lures him or her into revealing sensitive company information.2. Inform employees that the sender may pose as the company’s bank or as someone from the board of directors.Even after being taught about phishing, employees may still be suckered into clicking on a link inside an email — as staged phishing attacks have shown. To make things simple and to avoid confusion, simply demand that employees not click on any links inside emails. No exceptions. Tell them that nobody will be penalized for not clicking on a link inside an email.3. Employees should be suspicious of free download offers. Clicking on these could activate a computer virus.4. Employees should buy applications from a trusted app store rather than from third-party sources.It’s hard to know what those third parties’ true motivations are.5. Employees should be sure to protect all their devices with passwords.If an employee leaves a device unattended, or it’s lost, could the finders get into any documents, or have to type in a password (which they don’t know, of course)?6. All devices used for business should have a “wipe” function.The more employees you have, the harder it will be to get every single one to password-protect his or her devices. Another layer of protection, then, is to require a “wipe” function. If the device is lost or stolen, all the data on it can be eradicated — remotely.7. All devices used for business should erase their data automatically after a set number of password attempts. This will discourage hackers.8. All devices, especially Androids, should be required to have anti-virus software.This protects the device from malware that comes with an app that’s downloaded.9. Employees should never “jailbreak” or “root” a mobile device.Malware can infiltrate if the walled garden of the device is broken down because the user has manipulated the device’s factory-installed operating system.10. Employees should activate their update alerts immediately rather than opt for “remind me later.” These updates patch up security holes so that evolving cyber-pathogens do not gain entry.11. Employees should be made aware that Wi-Fi in public is not secure.Even though connections to public Wi-Fi will say they’re not secure, not all users notice this alert; and some may not even know what it means. Instead, using a virtual private network (VPN) will significantly boost security for your company’s sensitive data. A VPN service, such as Hotspot Shield VPN, encrypts all cyberspace transmissions, scrambling them so that hackers can’t make sense of them.Certainly it’s true that employees themselves may be crooks working from the inside to commit cybercrime. But a significant volume of data leakage still stems from simple carelessness by employees — and a lack of information and knowledge about security. What have you done about this threat at your own company?Related: Password Statistics: The Bad, the Worse and the Ugly (Infographic) Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 5 min read June 11, 2015 Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. How Success Happens Listen Nowlast_img read more