Tag: 上海419龙凤论团


Lionel Scaloni happy as Argentina boss


first_imgLionel Scaloni is pleased with how well things have gone at Argentina and is looking forward to continuing coaching the national teamThe 40-year-old’s appointment as manager of Argentina hasn’t been widely welcome with the legendary Diego Maradona frequently criticising the decision.But Scaloni’s results in charge of La Albiceleste speak for themselves with just one defeat, which came against Brazil in October, and four wins in his first six games.Now the former Lazio and Deportivo La Coruña defender is looking forward to leading Argentina at the 2019 Copa America.“I am happy because the objectives we set ourselves were achieved,” said Scaloni, according to Fox Sports.Raheem Sterling, EnglandTop 5 best players from the international break weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 After a fresh international break just came to an end, we need to talk about the Top 5 best players during this whole weekend.We…“To contribute players to this new team. I am happy to have the possibility to continue.”Scaloni’s only previous coaching experience came as an assistant for both La Liga side Sevilla and Argentina.He added: “It does not bother me that I do not have experience because it’s the reality. Any coach who starts, logically, has no experience.“I had the opportunity to be in an important technical body, in Seville and in the national team. I cannot get angry because it’s the truth.”last_img read more


Myanmar army uses fake photos to malign Rohingyas Reuters


first_imgA combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Flickr depicting the bodies of Bengalis being retrieved following their massacre in Dhaka in 1971. The same image (bottom) as it appears in the Myanmar army`s recently published book on the Rohingya describing it as the brutal killing of the local ethnic people by Bengalis in Myanmar. Photo: ReutersMyanmar’s army has used a photo of Bangladesh’s liberation war in a new book to cover their ethnic riots in the 1940s, reveals a Reuters exclusive report.The photo of the killing of the Bengalis (Bangladeshis) by the Pakistani forces was claimed to be the image of murder of Buddhists by Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority the Myanmar army refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants, according to the report.Reuters’ examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during the 1971 independence war of Bangladesh, a country that has given shelter to more than one million Rohingyas who fled Myanmar’s ethnic cleansing.Another photo in the book was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country, Reuters’ investigation found.Such fake photos were “sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit”, reads the Reuters report.In the 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I”, the army has tried to establish its own narrative of August 2017 crackdown, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh. Mass killings, rape, and arson were reported later on.The full report of the Reuters, filed with Yongon dateline, is given below:The grainy black-and-white photo, printed in a new book on the Rohingya crisis authored by Myanmar’s army, shows a man standing over two bodies, wielding a farming tool. “Bengalis killed local ethnics brutally”, reads the caption.The photo appears in a section of the book covering ethnic riots in Myanmar in the 1940s. The text says the image shows Buddhists murdered by Rohingya – members of a Muslim minority the book refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants.But a Reuters examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during Bangladesh’s 1971 independence war, when hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis were killed by Pakistani troops.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from the Pulitzer Prize website depicting the migration of Rwandan Hutu refugees in 1996 following violence in Rwanda. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, converted to black-and-white, describing the people as Bengalis entering the country following the British colonial occupation of lower Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIt is one of three images that appear in the book, published in July by the army’s department of public relations and psychological warfare, that have been misrepresented as archival pictures from the western state of Rakhine.In fact, Reuters found that two of the photos originally were taken in Bangladesh and Tanzania. A third was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country.Government spokesman Zaw Htay and a military spokesman could not be reached for comment on the authenticity of the images. U Myo Myint Maung, permanent secretary at the information ministry, declined to comment, saying he had not read the book.The 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I” relates the army’s narrative of August last year, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh, according to United Nations agencies, triggering reports of mass killings, rape, and arson. Tatmadaw is the official name of Myanmar’s military.Much of the content is sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit, which since the start of the crisis has distributed news giving the army’s perspective, mostly via Facebook.The book is on sale at bookstores across the commercial capital of Yangon. A member of staff at Innwa, one of the biggest bookshops in the city, said the 50 copies the store ordered had sold out, but there was no plan to order more. “Not many people came looking for it,” said the bookseller, who declined to be named.On Monday, Facebook banned the army chief and other military officials accused of using the platform to “inflame ethnic and religious tensions”. The same day, UN investigators accused Senior General Min Aung Hlaing of overseeing a campaign with “genocidal intent” and recommended he and other senior officials be prosecuted for crimes against humanity.In its new book, the military denies the allegations of abuses, blaming the violence on “Bengali terrorists” it says were intent on carving out a Rohingya state named “Arkistan”.Attacks allegedly by Rohingya militants calling themselves the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army preceded the military’s crackdown in August 2017 in Rakhine state, in which the UN investigators say 10,000 people may have been killed. The group denies it has separatist aims.The book also seeks to trace the history of the Rohingya – who regard themselves as native to western Myanmar – casting them as interlopers from Bangladesh.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Getty Images depicting Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants, who were trying to flee Myanmar, after their boat was seized by MyanmarÕs navy, near Yangon, in 2015. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, flipped and converted to black-and-white, describing Bengalis entering Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIn the introduction to the book the writer, listed as Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Kyaw Oo, says the text was compiled using “documentary photos” with the aim of “revealing the history of Bengalis”.“It can be found that whenever a political change or an ethnic armed conflict occurred in Myanmar those Bengalis take it as an opportunity,” the book reads, arguing that Muslims took advantage of the uncertainty of Myanmar’s nascent democratic transition to ignite “religious clashes”.Reuters was unable to contact Kyaw Kyaw Oo for comment.Reuters examined some of the photographs using Google Reverse Image Search and TinEye, tools commonly used by news organizations and others to identify images that have previously appeared online. Checks were then made with the previously credited publishers to establish the origins of those images.Of the 80 images in the book, most were recent pictures of army chief Min Aung Hlaing meeting foreign dignitaries or local officials visiting Rakhine. Several were screengrabs from videos posted by Rohingya militant group the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army.Of eight photos presented as historical images, Reuters found the provenance of three to be faked and was unable to determine the provenance of the five others.One faded black-and-white image shows a crowd of men who appear to be on a long march with their backs bent over. “Bengalis intruded into the country after the British Colonialism occupied the lower part of Myanmar,” the caption reads.The photo is apparently intended to depict Rohingya arriving in Myanmar during the colonial era, which ended in 1948. Reuters determined the picture is in fact a distorted version of a color image taken in 1996 of refugees fleeing the genocide in Rwanda. The photographer, Martha Rial, working for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won the Pulitzer Prize.The newspaper did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the use of its photo.Another picture, also printed in black-and-white, shows men aboard a rickety boat. “Bengalis entered Myanmar via the watercourse,” the caption reads.Actually, the original photo depicts Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants leaving Myanmar in 2015, when tens of thousands fled for Thailand and Malaysia. The original has been rotated and blurred so the photo looks granular. It was sourced from Myanmar’s own information ministry.last_img

PostMugabe presidential race in Zimbabwe on July 30


first_imgA Zimbabwe Electoral Commissioon (ZEC) official files through the voters roll at an inspection centre in Harare, ahead of Zimbabwe election. Photo: AFPZimbabwe announced on Wednesday it would choose a new president and parliament on 30 July, in the country’s first electoral test since the removal of its autocratic former leader Robert Mugabe.His successor, President Emmerson Mnangagwa, unveiled the date in the official Zimbabwe Government Gazette.”Monday, the 30th day of July, 2018 (is) the day of the election to the office of President, the election of members of the National Assembly and election of councillors,” Mnangagwa said in a proclamation.Once a right-hand man to the 94-year-old Mugabe, Mnangagwa dramatically succeeded the veteran leader in November after nearly four-decades in charge when troops swarmed the streets and briefly seized key sites.Mnangagwa, 75, will square off against the main opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party, now led by 40-year-old Nelson Chamisa following the death of Morgan Tsvangirai in February.If no candidate receives a simple majority in the first round of the presidential election, a run-off will be held on 8 September.Elections under Mugabe were marred by corruption, intimidation and violence, but Mnangagwa has vowed to hold a free and fair vote.The election will be the first to be monitored by Western observers in many years.On Monday Harare and the European Union announced that observers from the bloc would monitor polls in the southern African country for the first time in 16 years.- Western observers -The head of the last EU observer mission, Pierre Schori, was thrown out of Zimbabwe in 2002 on the eve of presidential elections that were condemned as flawed.Following the high-profile spat, Zimbabwe barred the EU and other Western observers from sending further missions to monitor polls in the country as Mugabe grew more and more defiant of foreign criticism up until his downfall.And in a further sign of Zimbabwe’s growing efforts to mend fences with former foes following Mugabe’s resignation, the country has applied to re-join the Commonwealth, the bloc of former British colonies said Monday.Harare’s membership was suspended in 2003 over the violent and graft-ridden elections the previous year.Zimbabwe left the Commonwealth at the height of violent land seizures, when white farmers were evicted in favour of landless black people — a policy that wrecked agriculture and triggered economic collapse.Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland confirmed that the organisation would also send observers to the elections.Mugabe sent shockwaves through the ruling ZANU-PF, the party he dominated for decades, when he recently posed with a retired general who will take on the government in this year’s election.Despite a slew of reformist pledges and announcements it is unclear whether Mnangagwa, who was a vital cog in the ZANU-PF party and helped Mugabe to hold onto power for 37 years, has won the support of ordinary Zimbabweans.last_img read more


Five more beaten to death in India lynching


first_imgMap of IndiaIndian police said Monday they have arrested 23 people after five men were bludgeoned to death by a crazed mob in yet another horrific lynching to rock the country.Local media estimate more than 25 people have been killed in recent months in similar cases sparked by false rumours spread on smartphones of child kidnapping or allegations of thievery or sexual harassment.The latest incident saw eight men set upon in Dhule district, 330 kilometres (205 miles) from India’s financial capital Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra on Sunday.Police said the attack began after locals spotted one of the eight talking to a child after they disembarked from a bus near the village of Rainpada.“They were confronted by the locals who had gathered at the Sunday market after suspecting them to be child kidnappers,” Dhule police chief M Ramkumar told AFP.Three of them escaped but five were dragged to the village council office and beaten to death with sticks and blunt objects.Police said they identified the alleged attackers from a video shot during the assault. Another dozen suspects were still on the run, they added.Those killed were from Solapur district of the same state but some 450 kilometres away.The current spate of lynchings started in May last year in eastern Jharkhand state after rumours on WhatsApp about child kidnappers led to the lynching of six men.The rumours have since resurfaced, with attacks reported in at least 11 states.The attacks-usually targeting outsiders-have left authorities scrambling to mount an effective response, with awareness campaigns and public alerts having a limited effect.Last week a “rumour buster” official tasked with alerting the public to such hoaxes was lynched by a mob in the remote northeastern state of Tripura.last_img read more