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People on the Move 061810


first_imgPeriodical Publishers’ Service Bureau, LLC (a unit of Hearst Corporation) named Steve Aster president. Prior to PPSB, Aster served as president of consumer marketing for Source Interlink and Primedia Enthusiast Media, which was acquired by Source Interlink in 2007. Time Inc. has promoted Jim Frederick to managing editor of Time.com and executive editor of Time magazine. Previously, Frederick served as a foreign correspondent in Europe and Asia.Longtime Vogue publisher and Condé Nast senior vice president/publishing director Tom Florio says he is leaving the company at the end of the month. He reportedly is looking to become CEO of his own company, although his exact plans are still unclear.Hearst appointed Eve Bercovici executive beauty director at Redbook magazine. Most recently, Bercovici served as a senior beauty director at InStyle.last_img read more


Myanmar army uses fake photos to malign Rohingyas Reuters


first_imgA combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Flickr depicting the bodies of Bengalis being retrieved following their massacre in Dhaka in 1971. The same image (bottom) as it appears in the Myanmar army`s recently published book on the Rohingya describing it as the brutal killing of the local ethnic people by Bengalis in Myanmar. Photo: ReutersMyanmar’s army has used a photo of Bangladesh’s liberation war in a new book to cover their ethnic riots in the 1940s, reveals a Reuters exclusive report.The photo of the killing of the Bengalis (Bangladeshis) by the Pakistani forces was claimed to be the image of murder of Buddhists by Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority the Myanmar army refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants, according to the report.Reuters’ examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during the 1971 independence war of Bangladesh, a country that has given shelter to more than one million Rohingyas who fled Myanmar’s ethnic cleansing.Another photo in the book was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country, Reuters’ investigation found.Such fake photos were “sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit”, reads the Reuters report.In the 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I”, the army has tried to establish its own narrative of August 2017 crackdown, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh. Mass killings, rape, and arson were reported later on.The full report of the Reuters, filed with Yongon dateline, is given below:The grainy black-and-white photo, printed in a new book on the Rohingya crisis authored by Myanmar’s army, shows a man standing over two bodies, wielding a farming tool. “Bengalis killed local ethnics brutally”, reads the caption.The photo appears in a section of the book covering ethnic riots in Myanmar in the 1940s. The text says the image shows Buddhists murdered by Rohingya – members of a Muslim minority the book refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants.But a Reuters examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during Bangladesh’s 1971 independence war, when hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis were killed by Pakistani troops.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from the Pulitzer Prize website depicting the migration of Rwandan Hutu refugees in 1996 following violence in Rwanda. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, converted to black-and-white, describing the people as Bengalis entering the country following the British colonial occupation of lower Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIt is one of three images that appear in the book, published in July by the army’s department of public relations and psychological warfare, that have been misrepresented as archival pictures from the western state of Rakhine.In fact, Reuters found that two of the photos originally were taken in Bangladesh and Tanzania. A third was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country.Government spokesman Zaw Htay and a military spokesman could not be reached for comment on the authenticity of the images. U Myo Myint Maung, permanent secretary at the information ministry, declined to comment, saying he had not read the book.The 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I” relates the army’s narrative of August last year, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh, according to United Nations agencies, triggering reports of mass killings, rape, and arson. Tatmadaw is the official name of Myanmar’s military.Much of the content is sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit, which since the start of the crisis has distributed news giving the army’s perspective, mostly via Facebook.The book is on sale at bookstores across the commercial capital of Yangon. A member of staff at Innwa, one of the biggest bookshops in the city, said the 50 copies the store ordered had sold out, but there was no plan to order more. “Not many people came looking for it,” said the bookseller, who declined to be named.On Monday, Facebook banned the army chief and other military officials accused of using the platform to “inflame ethnic and religious tensions”. The same day, UN investigators accused Senior General Min Aung Hlaing of overseeing a campaign with “genocidal intent” and recommended he and other senior officials be prosecuted for crimes against humanity.In its new book, the military denies the allegations of abuses, blaming the violence on “Bengali terrorists” it says were intent on carving out a Rohingya state named “Arkistan”.Attacks allegedly by Rohingya militants calling themselves the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army preceded the military’s crackdown in August 2017 in Rakhine state, in which the UN investigators say 10,000 people may have been killed. The group denies it has separatist aims.The book also seeks to trace the history of the Rohingya – who regard themselves as native to western Myanmar – casting them as interlopers from Bangladesh.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Getty Images depicting Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants, who were trying to flee Myanmar, after their boat was seized by MyanmarÕs navy, near Yangon, in 2015. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, flipped and converted to black-and-white, describing Bengalis entering Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIn the introduction to the book the writer, listed as Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Kyaw Oo, says the text was compiled using “documentary photos” with the aim of “revealing the history of Bengalis”.“It can be found that whenever a political change or an ethnic armed conflict occurred in Myanmar those Bengalis take it as an opportunity,” the book reads, arguing that Muslims took advantage of the uncertainty of Myanmar’s nascent democratic transition to ignite “religious clashes”.Reuters was unable to contact Kyaw Kyaw Oo for comment.Reuters examined some of the photographs using Google Reverse Image Search and TinEye, tools commonly used by news organizations and others to identify images that have previously appeared online. Checks were then made with the previously credited publishers to establish the origins of those images.Of the 80 images in the book, most were recent pictures of army chief Min Aung Hlaing meeting foreign dignitaries or local officials visiting Rakhine. Several were screengrabs from videos posted by Rohingya militant group the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army.Of eight photos presented as historical images, Reuters found the provenance of three to be faked and was unable to determine the provenance of the five others.One faded black-and-white image shows a crowd of men who appear to be on a long march with their backs bent over. “Bengalis intruded into the country after the British Colonialism occupied the lower part of Myanmar,” the caption reads.The photo is apparently intended to depict Rohingya arriving in Myanmar during the colonial era, which ended in 1948. Reuters determined the picture is in fact a distorted version of a color image taken in 1996 of refugees fleeing the genocide in Rwanda. The photographer, Martha Rial, working for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won the Pulitzer Prize.The newspaper did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the use of its photo.Another picture, also printed in black-and-white, shows men aboard a rickety boat. “Bengalis entered Myanmar via the watercourse,” the caption reads.Actually, the original photo depicts Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants leaving Myanmar in 2015, when tens of thousands fled for Thailand and Malaysia. The original has been rotated and blurred so the photo looks granular. It was sourced from Myanmar’s own information ministry.last_img

14party JaPa to join polls in alliance Quader


first_imgBangladesh Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader. File PhotoThe Awami League-led 14-party alliance and the Jatiya Party-led Sammilito Jatiya Jote on Monday agreed that they will join the next general election together under the banner of Grand Alliance, reports UNB.”We’ve reached a consensus that we, the Grand Alliance, including the 14-party, will contest the election in alliance and form the government together,” said Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader.He came up with the remarks while talking to reporters after a dialogue between the 14-party and Sammilito Jatiya Jote at the prime minister’s official residence Ganabhaban.Quader said the Jatiya Party also agreed with the 14-praty to hold the election as per the law and the constitution.He also said they did not take any decision about the seat shearing with Jatiya Party as it will be finalised later after a small-group discussion. “It’s not a problem.”In her introductory speech at the dialogue, prime minister Sheikh Hasina said the country’s ongoing development trend will continue through a meaningful general election. “There’ll be the continuation of the development trend through a meaningful election,” she said.Prime minister and Awami League president Sheikh Hasina led a 23-member 14-party delegation while Jatiya Party chairman HM Ershad a 32-member team of the Jatiya Jote at the talks that began around 7:15pm and ended around 9pm at the prime minister’s official residence Ganabhaban.Describing vote as the rights of citizens, the prime minister said the country’s people will certainly exercise their voting rights.She said it is Awami League which struggled for long to establish people’s voting rights.She mentioned that the responsibility of the politicians is to work for people’s welfare and the Awami League government has been working to this end.Sheikh Hasina said Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman developed the war-ravaged country soon after the Liberation War and turned Bangladesh into a least developed one only in three and a half years of his tenure.Following his footprint, she said, the Awami League government has worked for the socio-economic uplift of the people for which Bangladesh has now been established as a developing country.The prime minister thanked the opposition in parliament, Jatiya Party, for cooperating with the government in unleashing development.Jatiya Party senior co-chairman and opposition leader in parliament Raushon Ershad, its co-chairman GM Quader, secretary general Ruhul Amin Hawlader and presidium member and environment, forests and climate change minister Anisul Islam Mahmud were among the Jatiya Jote delegation memebrs.last_img read more


Scientists go to great lengths to extend superlow friction


first_img Citation: Scientists go to great lengths to extend superlow friction (2015, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-scientists-great-lengths-superlow-friction.html Researchers investigated the superlow friction of the chain structures above. They found that superlubricity can theoretically hold for tens of cemtimeters and disappears above a critical chain length, which depends on a material’s intrinsic properties. Credit: Ma, et al. ©2015 American Physical Society In the new study published in Physical Review Letters, researchers Ming Ma, et al., have theoretically investigated the maximum length of a chain of particles that exhibits superlubricity. Their model shows that this critical length depends on the experimental parameters and the material’s properties, especially its stiffness. For very stiff materials, such as carbon nanotubes, the scientists found that superlubricity may hold for up to tens of centimeters, after which it abruptly disappears. “These results indicate an avenue for achieving superlow friction at the macroscale, and can potentially aid in the rational design of superlubric materials for nanomechanical applications,” Michael Urbakh, a professor at Tel Aviv University and one of the study’s lead authors, told Phys.org.As the scientists explain, superlow friction relies on a special arrangement of atoms on a material’s surface. In graphite, for instance, the surface atoms have a bumpy hexagonal arrangement like egg cartons/boxes. In certain orientations, two surfaces of graphite can mesh in such a way that the “bumps” can slide past one other effortlessly, and friction drops to almost zero. In contrast, when the same pieces of graphite are slightly rotated with respect to each other, their surface atoms can no longer easily slide, and the materials exhibit the familiar effects of friction. This kind of change in geometrical configuration can explain the abrupt transition between the frictionless and friction regimes in the researchers’ models. A shorter nanotube, or chain, exhibits superlubricity because its particles are mismatched, or incommensurate, with the underlying substrate atoms. Since the atoms avoid interlocking with each other, the chain easily slides on the surface. But for a longer chain, a mechanical instability triggers lattice matching at the chain’s leading edge. As a result, the particles become in registry, or commensurate, with the atoms in the substrate lattice, and friction suddenly increases.The researchers’ simulations also revealed that the critical chain length forms a sharp boundary between two phases based on interparticle distance: the distance between particles is smaller in the shorter chain than in the longer chain. At exactly the critical length, an abrupt jump in this distance occurs, along with the abrupt jump in friction. By better understanding superlubricity and its limits, the researchers hope to extend the effect to as large a scale as possible. Superlubricity could prove very useful for designing nanoscale systems with low wear and tear, and it could be even more useful if it could be extended to larger scales. “The challenge here is to scale up the size of the sliding objects without losing the perfect egg-box geometry necessary for superlubricity,” said coauthor Andrea Vanossi at the CNR-IOM Democritos National Simulation Center and the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), both in Trieste, Italy. “Normally, as the size of the objects grows, defects and imperfections comes into play. Only recently, thanks to the impressive advances in the synthesis techniques, has it been possible to produce defect-free, atomically perfect elongated nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, and conjugated polymers. Once it is possible to have two large-scale, geometrically perfect surfaces rub against each other without friction, and to apply this material as a coating to ball bearings and moving machine parts, there will be huge savings ahead in the areas of energy, resource consumption, and maintenance.”The researchers are currently working to expand their approach to understand mechanisms limiting superlow friction between 3D materials. © 2015 Phys.org (Phys.org)—When nanosized pieces of graphite slide against each other, there can be virtually no friction between them. For many years, superlow friction, or “superlubricity,” was known to exist only on the nanoscale. Then in 2012, scientists first demonstrated superlubricity beyond the nanoscale when they discovered the phenomenon in micrometer-sized graphite. Building on this and related research, scientists in a new study have now theoretically shown that superlow friction could extend to lengths of tens of centimeters. More information: Ming Ma, et al. “Critical Length Limiting Superlow Friction.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.055501center_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters Friction almost vanishes in microscale graphite Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more


Musical lessons for Sarah Jane


first_imgTaking her passion for music a step forward, actress-singer Sarah Jane Dias is learning the acoustic guitar to hone her musical skills. “I always had a nag to learn an instrument since my childhood. However, I never got to do so… I believe that learning of any kind of music…be it instrumental or vocal… enhances your ability as an artist,” Sarah Jane said in a statement. She is taking vocal lessons from Samantha Edward and instrument from a Parsi musician. The former Miss India, who released her first single Forgot to be me on Valentine’s Day this year, shared that she is an ‘obedient student’. “I’m very happy to have found someone who has learnt the art of acoustic guitar from the golden era of guitar. I’m an obedient student,” she added.last_img


Feeling Frazzled This Wearable Gadget Can Help Keep Your Stress in Check


first_img 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. December 17, 2014 Entrepreneurs are some of the most stressed-out people you’ll ever meet. If left to fester, the constant worry and pressure of running your own business can spiral into a nerve-thrashing mess of anxiety, depression and despair. It’s not pretty.But Spire, an ambitious zen master for your pocket, sure is — in looks and in concept. Clipping onto your belt, or your underwear or bra, Spire is a stone-shaped activity tracker like a Fitbit Zip — only it also measures something equally as important to your health as footsteps. It measures your state of mind, or so its makers claim.Related: A Fitbit For Your Employees’ Emotional Health? It’s Already Happening. Using the real-time breathing pattern data it constantly collects and crunches, Spire gently informs you of how tense, distracted or just plain freaked out you are. Then — here’s the coolest part — it gently nudges you to focus, breathe deeply and calm down. And not in a pushy way either. It sends a series of soothing suggestions and meditations directly to your smartphone.Or, should you fall into a funk, a lethargic slump, Spire turns into a motivational coach, goading you to get up and get moving.”It’s very hard to stay mindful throughout our chaotic and always connected day,” Spire co-founder and CEO Jonathan Palley told The Huffington Post. “The design of the Spire experience is not to interrupt you every time you’re tense, but to bring mindfulness and awareness streaks of tension/focus/calm within this chaos.”Related: Weird But True: Microsoft Is Developing a Stress-Monitoring BraThe wireless-charging gizmo costs $150 and works with a free iPhone app (an Android app is on the way) that pings you with pacifying notifications all day long. Sometimes it too many notifications, according to one re/code reviewer who reported that the Spire was glitchy. Wireless connectivity was an issue and so was battery life, during her test. Spire said it’s working on it and should have the kinks worked out with updates to its hardware and software.To see Spire in action for yourself, take a deep breath and check out trippy promo video:Related: Nintendo Unveils First ‘Quality of Life’ Device: a Non-Wearable Sleep Trackercenter_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more


11 Tips to Secure Mobile Devices and Client Data


first_img You have employees. They bring smartphones to work. All is fine, right? Wrong.Related: Meet the Cybersecurity Startup That’s Caught the Eye of Google’s Eric Schmidt First of all, the second an employee brings a personal mobile device to work, you can bet on a fusion of personal and business affairs occurring. This was evident when 2,000 office workers were surveyed as to:How many downloaded personal apps to tablets issued by their employer: 73 percentHow many did this with smartphones their company issued: 62 percentHow many did it with company-issued notebooks: 45 percentThe age group most guilty of this: 25 to 38 years oldThe number who used their smartphones and other mobile units to conduct company business: over 50 percentThat last percentage was slightly better news. But it hardly canceled out the aforementioned misuse, which may result in who-knows-how-much company business leaking outside the building to who knows where. That “50 percent” also raises the question: Have you, a decision-maker at your company, devised any plans to prevent or minimize how much company data leaves your building, in the form of storage inside your employees’ smartphones and other mobile devices?The solutions may lie in the strategies that company decision-makers and IT managers can draw on to control data leakage. These strategies fall under something called enterprise mobile management. But cooperation is required from both parties: the company and the employees.As a decision-maker, then, you’d be smart to think: “We’ll just never know, will we, where an employee’s smartphone ends up on the weekends — a device loaded with our most sensitive data!”Solutions for businessesBusiness owners and other company decision-makers should regard the personal smartphone as a potential company diary. You don’t want this diary going all over the place after hours. You don’t want it easily opened for all to see what’s written on the pages.Related: 4 Essentials to Secure Your Business Even From State-Sponsored Online ThreatsSo, try consider these strategies:1. Teach employees about phishing scams.Phishing maneuvers are a leading way that cybercriminals steal data. Research shows how easy it is to get employees to fall for these scams: The worker receives an email that has an urgency to it (e.g., subject line: “Get back to me asap”). Inside the mail is a link that the sender urges the recipient to click on. The link takes the user to a fake website that lures him or her into revealing sensitive company information.2. Inform employees that the sender may pose as the company’s bank or as someone from the board of directors.Even after being taught about phishing, employees may still be suckered into clicking on a link inside an email — as staged phishing attacks have shown. To make things simple and to avoid confusion, simply demand that employees not click on any links inside emails. No exceptions. Tell them that nobody will be penalized for not clicking on a link inside an email.3. Employees should be suspicious of free download offers. Clicking on these could activate a computer virus.4. Employees should buy applications from a trusted app store rather than from third-party sources.It’s hard to know what those third parties’ true motivations are.5. Employees should be sure to protect all their devices with passwords.If an employee leaves a device unattended, or it’s lost, could the finders get into any documents, or have to type in a password (which they don’t know, of course)?6. All devices used for business should have a “wipe” function.The more employees you have, the harder it will be to get every single one to password-protect his or her devices. Another layer of protection, then, is to require a “wipe” function. If the device is lost or stolen, all the data on it can be eradicated — remotely.7. All devices used for business should erase their data automatically after a set number of password attempts. This will discourage hackers.8. All devices, especially Androids, should be required to have anti-virus software.This protects the device from malware that comes with an app that’s downloaded.9. Employees should never “jailbreak” or “root” a mobile device.Malware can infiltrate if the walled garden of the device is broken down because the user has manipulated the device’s factory-installed operating system.10. Employees should activate their update alerts immediately rather than opt for “remind me later.” These updates patch up security holes so that evolving cyber-pathogens do not gain entry.11. Employees should be made aware that Wi-Fi in public is not secure.Even though connections to public Wi-Fi will say they’re not secure, not all users notice this alert; and some may not even know what it means. Instead, using a virtual private network (VPN) will significantly boost security for your company’s sensitive data. A VPN service, such as Hotspot Shield VPN, encrypts all cyberspace transmissions, scrambling them so that hackers can’t make sense of them.Certainly it’s true that employees themselves may be crooks working from the inside to commit cybercrime. But a significant volume of data leakage still stems from simple carelessness by employees — and a lack of information and knowledge about security. What have you done about this threat at your own company?Related: Password Statistics: The Bad, the Worse and the Ugly (Infographic) Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 5 min read June 11, 2015 Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. How Success Happens Listen Nowlast_img read more