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People on the Move


first_imgWired shook up its editorial department this week, poaching David Pierce from The Verge to be its top personal tech writer. Editor-in-chief, Scott Dadich, also handed out several promotions, including naming Robert Capps head of editorial for Wired’s magazine, website and live events. Mark Robinson and Joe Brown were also named executive editors for the brand’s magazine and website, respectively. Here are the rest of this week’s people on the move: Reed Exhibitions appointed Alicia Tillman as its senior vice president of fashion and vision. Tillman had been head of marketing and business services for American Express Global Business Travel. The Economist named Zanny Minton Beddoes editor of the magazine. Beddoes had been serving as the title’s business affairs editor. Sophie Donelson has been named editor-in-chief of House Beautiful. Donelson was most recently at Cricket’s Circle. Fortune has brought on Michael Lawton to be its new creative director, overseeing a redesign of the title. Lawton had been serving as Popular Mechanic’s design director. Robb Report has named Robert Crozier as managing director of its international division. Crozier is a co-founder and had been serving as global business development director for Billionaire. Northstar Travel Media has hired David Blansfield to be executive vice president and group publisher of its meetings group. Blansfield joins Northstar after seven years as president of F+W Media. Garrett Graff was promoted to editor of Politico Maga​zine. Graff had been a senior writer.last_img read more


Suu Kyi blames Bangladesh for delay in Rohingya repatriation


first_imgMyanmar state counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi delivers her address during the 43rd Singapore Lecture in Singapore on 21 August 2018. Aung San Suu Kyi said on 21 August it is up to Bangladesh to decide how quickly Rohingya refugees will return to Myanmar, appearing to cast blame on the country for the delay. — AFPAung San Suu Kyi said Tuesday it was up to Bangladesh to decide how quickly Rohingya refugees would return to Myanmar, appearing to blame Dhaka for the delay.More than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled Buddhist-majority Myanmar to Bangladesh after a brutal military crackdown on the stateless minority almost a year ago.The two countries last November signed a deal to repatriate them but it has stalled. Many fear returning to a place where villages were burned to the ground and where they say security forces murdered, tortured and raped members of their communities.Bangladesh insists the Rohingya are on its soil temporarily but has not forced them back.In rare public remarks on the crisis, civilian leader Suu Kyi said in a speech in Singapore that Myanmar has been ready to receive Rohingya returnees since 23 January as agreed in the memorandum of understanding.”It’s very difficult for us to put a time frame on it by ourselves unilaterally because we have to work with Bangladesh in order to do that,” she told an audience in a lecture organised by the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute and entitled “Myanmar’s Democratic Transition: Challenges and Way Forward”.”Bangladesh would also have to decide how quickly they want the process to be completed,” Suu Kyi added.Since the repatriation was signed the two countries have wrangled over details, including the way refugees are described on ID cards in Bangladesh.- Crumbling reputation -Rohingya living in the crowded camps over the border in Cox’s Bazar insist on safety guarantees and citizenship rights before returning to Rakhine state in western Myanmar, where the United Nations says conditions are not ready for their return.The US and UN have described the military’s campaign as ethnic cleansing and there is scepticism over whether Myanmar seriously intends to allow mass returns.The crackdown against the Rohingya was sparked on 25 August last year when insurgents attacked police posts.Calls have mounted for Myanmar’s military to be held responsible for the campaign, in which thousands are estimated to have died, and the US has sanctioned two army brigades and several commanders who oversaw the expulsion.But Myanmar says it was simply defending itself and bristles at international calls for justice, arguing that the world does not understand the problem.Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate once under house arrest by the junta that ruled for decades, has seen her global reputation crumble since coming to power for failing to speak up for the Rohingya.”We who are living through the transition in Myanmar view it differently from those who observe it from the outside and who will remain untouched from its outcome,” she said, appearing relaxed and jocular.She also blamed Rohingya insurgents and avoided criticism of the military.”The danger of terrorist activities which was the initial cause of events leading to the humanitarian crisis in Rakhine remains real and present today,” she said.”Unless these security challenges are addressed, the risk of communal violence would remain.”The Rohingya are seen as outsiders in Myanmar but consider Rakhine their homeland.They were stripped of their citizenship decades ago and subject to periodic purges while denied access to healthcare and freedom of movement.last_img read more


Myanmar army uses fake photos to malign Rohingyas Reuters


first_imgA combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Flickr depicting the bodies of Bengalis being retrieved following their massacre in Dhaka in 1971. The same image (bottom) as it appears in the Myanmar army`s recently published book on the Rohingya describing it as the brutal killing of the local ethnic people by Bengalis in Myanmar. Photo: ReutersMyanmar’s army has used a photo of Bangladesh’s liberation war in a new book to cover their ethnic riots in the 1940s, reveals a Reuters exclusive report.The photo of the killing of the Bengalis (Bangladeshis) by the Pakistani forces was claimed to be the image of murder of Buddhists by Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority the Myanmar army refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants, according to the report.Reuters’ examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during the 1971 independence war of Bangladesh, a country that has given shelter to more than one million Rohingyas who fled Myanmar’s ethnic cleansing.Another photo in the book was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country, Reuters’ investigation found.Such fake photos were “sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit”, reads the Reuters report.In the 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I”, the army has tried to establish its own narrative of August 2017 crackdown, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh. Mass killings, rape, and arson were reported later on.The full report of the Reuters, filed with Yongon dateline, is given below:The grainy black-and-white photo, printed in a new book on the Rohingya crisis authored by Myanmar’s army, shows a man standing over two bodies, wielding a farming tool. “Bengalis killed local ethnics brutally”, reads the caption.The photo appears in a section of the book covering ethnic riots in Myanmar in the 1940s. The text says the image shows Buddhists murdered by Rohingya – members of a Muslim minority the book refers to as “Bengalis” to imply they are illegal immigrants.But a Reuters examination of the photograph shows it was actually taken during Bangladesh’s 1971 independence war, when hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis were killed by Pakistani troops.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from the Pulitzer Prize website depicting the migration of Rwandan Hutu refugees in 1996 following violence in Rwanda. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, converted to black-and-white, describing the people as Bengalis entering the country following the British colonial occupation of lower Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIt is one of three images that appear in the book, published in July by the army’s department of public relations and psychological warfare, that have been misrepresented as archival pictures from the western state of Rakhine.In fact, Reuters found that two of the photos originally were taken in Bangladesh and Tanzania. A third was falsely labeled as depicting Rohingya entering Myanmar from Bangladesh, when in reality it showed migrants leaving the country.Government spokesman Zaw Htay and a military spokesman could not be reached for comment on the authenticity of the images. U Myo Myint Maung, permanent secretary at the information ministry, declined to comment, saying he had not read the book.The 117-page “Myanmar Politics and the Tatmadaw: Part I” relates the army’s narrative of August last year, when some 700,000 Rohingya fled Rakhine to Bangladesh, according to United Nations agencies, triggering reports of mass killings, rape, and arson. Tatmadaw is the official name of Myanmar’s military.Much of the content is sourced to the military’s “True News” information unit, which since the start of the crisis has distributed news giving the army’s perspective, mostly via Facebook.The book is on sale at bookstores across the commercial capital of Yangon. A member of staff at Innwa, one of the biggest bookshops in the city, said the 50 copies the store ordered had sold out, but there was no plan to order more. “Not many people came looking for it,” said the bookseller, who declined to be named.On Monday, Facebook banned the army chief and other military officials accused of using the platform to “inflame ethnic and religious tensions”. The same day, UN investigators accused Senior General Min Aung Hlaing of overseeing a campaign with “genocidal intent” and recommended he and other senior officials be prosecuted for crimes against humanity.In its new book, the military denies the allegations of abuses, blaming the violence on “Bengali terrorists” it says were intent on carving out a Rohingya state named “Arkistan”.Attacks allegedly by Rohingya militants calling themselves the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army preceded the military’s crackdown in August 2017 in Rakhine state, in which the UN investigators say 10,000 people may have been killed. The group denies it has separatist aims.The book also seeks to trace the history of the Rohingya – who regard themselves as native to western Myanmar – casting them as interlopers from Bangladesh.A combination of screenshots shows (top) an image taken from Getty Images depicting Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants, who were trying to flee Myanmar, after their boat was seized by MyanmarÕs navy, near Yangon, in 2015. The same image (bottom) appears in the Myanmar armyÕs recently published book on the Rohingya, flipped and converted to black-and-white, describing Bengalis entering Myanmar. Photo: ReutersIn the introduction to the book the writer, listed as Lieutenant Colonel Kyaw Kyaw Oo, says the text was compiled using “documentary photos” with the aim of “revealing the history of Bengalis”.“It can be found that whenever a political change or an ethnic armed conflict occurred in Myanmar those Bengalis take it as an opportunity,” the book reads, arguing that Muslims took advantage of the uncertainty of Myanmar’s nascent democratic transition to ignite “religious clashes”.Reuters was unable to contact Kyaw Kyaw Oo for comment.Reuters examined some of the photographs using Google Reverse Image Search and TinEye, tools commonly used by news organizations and others to identify images that have previously appeared online. Checks were then made with the previously credited publishers to establish the origins of those images.Of the 80 images in the book, most were recent pictures of army chief Min Aung Hlaing meeting foreign dignitaries or local officials visiting Rakhine. Several were screengrabs from videos posted by Rohingya militant group the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army.Of eight photos presented as historical images, Reuters found the provenance of three to be faked and was unable to determine the provenance of the five others.One faded black-and-white image shows a crowd of men who appear to be on a long march with their backs bent over. “Bengalis intruded into the country after the British Colonialism occupied the lower part of Myanmar,” the caption reads.The photo is apparently intended to depict Rohingya arriving in Myanmar during the colonial era, which ended in 1948. Reuters determined the picture is in fact a distorted version of a color image taken in 1996 of refugees fleeing the genocide in Rwanda. The photographer, Martha Rial, working for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won the Pulitzer Prize.The newspaper did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the use of its photo.Another picture, also printed in black-and-white, shows men aboard a rickety boat. “Bengalis entered Myanmar via the watercourse,” the caption reads.Actually, the original photo depicts Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants leaving Myanmar in 2015, when tens of thousands fled for Thailand and Malaysia. The original has been rotated and blurred so the photo looks granular. It was sourced from Myanmar’s own information ministry.last_img

Chair poetry evenings to take place in November


first_imgCome November, winter in Calcutta will get warm and cozy as the culture capital gets set to witness the first ever International poetry extravaganza. The festival presented by The Chair Literary Trust will host poets from across the world and some from our home too. The stellar lineup of poets who will be part of these evenings are, Vladimir Matinovski (Macedonia), John W Sexton (Ireland), Miriam Van hee (Belgium), Alfred Schaffer (Netherlands), Les Wicks (Australia), Barbara Pogacnik (Slovenia), Yekta (France), C P Surendran, K Satchidanandan, Nitoo Das, Rajesh Joshi, Arun Kamal, Manglesh Dabral, Subodh Sarkar and Binayak Bandopadhyay. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The festival aims at building consciousness through poetry. Art and Poetry are the expressions of human consciousness. We endeavor to bring together the civil society in an interaction with thoughts, ideas, and questions related to human existence,” festival director Tushar Dhawal Singh said. “As the planet becomes progressively anxious with sociopolitical, radical, cultural, ethnonational skirmishes, we consider the role of Poetry as a restorative and a potent mean of diffusing values and experiences – all the more pertinent”, festival co-director Sonnet Mondal added. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe inaugural programme of the fest will take place on November 23 at Rotary Sadan Hall, followed by Calcutta Heritage Bungalow readings, Walk through the City and readings at Sasha’s studio on November 24. The finale, November 25, will be a floating event with poetry on the cruise over the river Ganges.The trust has also declared a ‘Poet in residence program’ to be hosted in Kolkata during the winter months. The residency will host two to three poets from across the globe where they would be offered a stay for a month in the city with a scholarship to cover up their costs in the city. The poets will also be offered an opportunity to present public readings in the city. During their stay, the poets will interact for a cultural exchange with culturally interested people, artists, organizations, and writers in West Bengal.last_img read more