JaPa to fix its role in parliament Thursday GM Quader


first_imgGM QuaderJatiya Party co-chairman GM Quader on Wednesday said its parliamentary party on Thursday will decide its role in the 11th parliament, reports UNB.”Our newly-elected MPs will join Jatiya Party Parliamentary Party meeting tomorrow (Thursday) after taking oath,” he said.GM Quader further said, “The parliamentary party meeting will decide what will be the role of Jatiya Party in parliament considering the interests of the country and the Grand Alliance.”Talking to reporters after a joint meeting of Jatiya Party’s presidium members and newly elected MPs at party chairman’s Banani office, he also said they will talk about the issue with the Grand Alliance after their meeting.”We’re there in the Grand Alliance and contested the election with the alliance partners with identical goals. So, we’ll finlaise all the decisions through discussions.”The JaPa co-chairman said the joint meeting of the party presidium members and new MPs discussed the country’s overall situation and evaluated the political activities.Party secretary general Moshiur Rahman Ranga said they will take some steps to strengthen JaPa further.He also said Jatiya Party Parliamentary Party members will sit with the Grand Alliance to determine the party’s role in parliament.Jatiya Party senor leaders and newly-elected MPs joined the meeting held with GM Quader in the chair.However, party chairman HM Ershad and senior co-chairman Raushon Ershad did not attend the meeting.On Tuesday, Moshiur Rahman Ranga said they would decide on Wednesday whether they would remain as the opposition or the part of government in parliament.last_img read more


Stopping question leaks Dipu Monis key challenge


first_imgfile photo:UNBWhen quality of education remains a critical challenge for both policymakers and industries, unfair means in public examinations still remains a key problem.New education minister Dipu Moni on Tuesday said the main challenge of her ministry is to tackle the perennial problem of question paper leaks.She came up with the remark while talking to reporters after joining office at the Secretariat for the first time after taking the oath of office on Monday, reports UNB.”People have elected the government by casting their votes for Awami League with some expectations and we’ll try our best to fulfill that. The government will do whatever is necessary,” she said.The tenure of former education minister Nurul Islam Nahid in two stints since 2009 was plagued by allegations of question paper leaks not only in public examinations but also in enrolment test and examinations for hiring.The new minister urged all to work as a team and implement all the election pledges made by the government.Awami League president Sheikh Hasina along with her 46 cabinet members on Monday took oath following her party Awami League’s massive victory in the 11th national election on 30 December amid allegations of rigging, vote stuffing, filing of fictitious cases and violence.Apart from the prime minister, there are 24 ministers, 19 state ministers and three deputy ministers in the new cabinet.Of the 47-member cabinet, 27 are new faces who are picked in a bid to infuse dynamism into the cabinet activities to implement the election manifesto the ruling party placed before the nation.last_img read more


PostMugabe presidential race in Zimbabwe on July 30


first_imgA Zimbabwe Electoral Commissioon (ZEC) official files through the voters roll at an inspection centre in Harare, ahead of Zimbabwe election. Photo: AFPZimbabwe announced on Wednesday it would choose a new president and parliament on 30 July, in the country’s first electoral test since the removal of its autocratic former leader Robert Mugabe.His successor, President Emmerson Mnangagwa, unveiled the date in the official Zimbabwe Government Gazette.”Monday, the 30th day of July, 2018 (is) the day of the election to the office of President, the election of members of the National Assembly and election of councillors,” Mnangagwa said in a proclamation.Once a right-hand man to the 94-year-old Mugabe, Mnangagwa dramatically succeeded the veteran leader in November after nearly four-decades in charge when troops swarmed the streets and briefly seized key sites.Mnangagwa, 75, will square off against the main opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party, now led by 40-year-old Nelson Chamisa following the death of Morgan Tsvangirai in February.If no candidate receives a simple majority in the first round of the presidential election, a run-off will be held on 8 September.Elections under Mugabe were marred by corruption, intimidation and violence, but Mnangagwa has vowed to hold a free and fair vote.The election will be the first to be monitored by Western observers in many years.On Monday Harare and the European Union announced that observers from the bloc would monitor polls in the southern African country for the first time in 16 years.- Western observers -The head of the last EU observer mission, Pierre Schori, was thrown out of Zimbabwe in 2002 on the eve of presidential elections that were condemned as flawed.Following the high-profile spat, Zimbabwe barred the EU and other Western observers from sending further missions to monitor polls in the country as Mugabe grew more and more defiant of foreign criticism up until his downfall.And in a further sign of Zimbabwe’s growing efforts to mend fences with former foes following Mugabe’s resignation, the country has applied to re-join the Commonwealth, the bloc of former British colonies said Monday.Harare’s membership was suspended in 2003 over the violent and graft-ridden elections the previous year.Zimbabwe left the Commonwealth at the height of violent land seizures, when white farmers were evicted in favour of landless black people — a policy that wrecked agriculture and triggered economic collapse.Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland confirmed that the organisation would also send observers to the elections.Mugabe sent shockwaves through the ruling ZANU-PF, the party he dominated for decades, when he recently posed with a retired general who will take on the government in this year’s election.Despite a slew of reformist pledges and announcements it is unclear whether Mnangagwa, who was a vital cog in the ZANU-PF party and helped Mugabe to hold onto power for 37 years, has won the support of ordinary Zimbabweans.last_img read more


Five more beaten to death in India lynching


first_imgMap of IndiaIndian police said Monday they have arrested 23 people after five men were bludgeoned to death by a crazed mob in yet another horrific lynching to rock the country.Local media estimate more than 25 people have been killed in recent months in similar cases sparked by false rumours spread on smartphones of child kidnapping or allegations of thievery or sexual harassment.The latest incident saw eight men set upon in Dhule district, 330 kilometres (205 miles) from India’s financial capital Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra on Sunday.Police said the attack began after locals spotted one of the eight talking to a child after they disembarked from a bus near the village of Rainpada.“They were confronted by the locals who had gathered at the Sunday market after suspecting them to be child kidnappers,” Dhule police chief M Ramkumar told AFP.Three of them escaped but five were dragged to the village council office and beaten to death with sticks and blunt objects.Police said they identified the alleged attackers from a video shot during the assault. Another dozen suspects were still on the run, they added.Those killed were from Solapur district of the same state but some 450 kilometres away.The current spate of lynchings started in May last year in eastern Jharkhand state after rumours on WhatsApp about child kidnappers led to the lynching of six men.The rumours have since resurfaced, with attacks reported in at least 11 states.The attacks-usually targeting outsiders-have left authorities scrambling to mount an effective response, with awareness campaigns and public alerts having a limited effect.Last week a “rumour buster” official tasked with alerting the public to such hoaxes was lynched by a mob in the remote northeastern state of Tripura.last_img read more


No security threat centering Pahela Baishakh home minister


first_imgHome minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal. File PhotoHome minister Asaduzzaman Khan Kamal on Saturday said there is no specific security threat centering this year’s Pahela Baishakh celebration programme, reports UNB.“There is no specific threat. Besides, detectives’ surveillance is on. No one will be able to create any obstruction in the celebration programme,” he said while talking to reporters after visiting DMP’s security arrangements at Ramna Park.He said Pahela Baishakh has now become a national progamme and law enforcers have been kept ready across the country so that people can celebrate Pahela Baishakh smoothly.Cyber decurity team is also monitoring social media sites so that no one can spread provocative messages, said the minister.last_img


Trump plans to declare national emergency


first_imgIn this file photo taken on February 12, 2019 US President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, DC as Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan (L) and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross(R) look on. Photo: AFPPresident Donald Trump plans to declare a national emergency to fund his controversial border wall, the White House said Thursday, a move that alarmed US lawmakers shortly before they passed legislation to avert a government shutdown.Trump has signaled he will sign the massive spending measure keeping federal agencies operational through 30 September.But it does not specifically fund a wall on the US-Mexico border, and Trump’s emergency declaration would help him bypass Congress to locate and redirect billions of dollars in funding to build it.Trump will take the action “to ensure we stop the national security and humanitarian crisis at the border,” White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said shortly before the Senate passed the spending bill.The House of Representatives followed suit hours later, and Trump has until a midnight Friday deadline to sign it and prevent the government from going into shutdown for the second time this year.Signing the spending bill would bring an end to a rolling, two-month battle over government funding. But by declaring an emergency, Trump opens a new confrontation — and creates some of the riskiest legal peril of his term.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Trump’s Democratic nemesis in Congress, said members of her caucus were “reviewing our options” about how to respond to Trump’s move.”Declaring a national emergency would be a lawless act, a gross abuse of the power of the presidency and a desperate attempt to distract from the fact that president Trump broke his core promise to have Mexico pay for his wall,” Pelosi and senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement.Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell said he backs the president, but several others in the Republican camp have expressed deep reservations.”I have concerns about the precedent that could be set with the use of emergency action to re-appropriate funds,” veteran Republican senator Chuck Grassley said in a statement.Senator Susan Collins said it “would be a mistake on the part of the president” to declare such an emergency, warning it would “undermine” lawmakers’ all-important role as financial appropriators.Many lawmakers have said they have no idea from where Trump will draw the funding. Democrats in particular have signaled that the move would open the door to future presidents declaring emergencies on various topics, from gun violence to climate change to the opioid crisis.Court challenges likelyUnder the National Emergencies Act, the president can declare a national emergency, providing a specific reason for it.That allows the mobilization of hundreds of dormant emergency powers under other laws, which can permit the White House to declare martial law, suspend civil liberties, expand the military, seize property and restrict trade, communications and financial transactions.Trump has repeatedly stated he will look to other federal sources to fund his wall, one of his top campaign trail promises from 2016.There is broad expectation that Trump’s move would be challenged in court.And house judiciary committee Jerry Nadler expressed support for a joint congressional resolution to “terminate” Trump’s emergency declaration.That resolution would likely pass the Democratically-controlled House, but it would face a tough road in the Senate, where several Republicans may not wish to cross the president.Even if it passed, Trump could veto it.The spending measure includes only $1.375 billion for border barriers or fencing, far from the $5.7 billion that Trump has sought for his long-promised border wall — a demand that led to the recent 35-day government shutdown, the longest in US history.The compromise package funds until 30 September the 25 per cent of the government whose operations would lapse if the bill is not signed by Trump by the midnight Friday deadline.Pelosi expressed disdain for the president’s upcoming emergency declaration, warning that he was doing “an end run around Congress.””It’s not an emergency, what’s happening at the border,” she said in comments echoed by multiple Democratic lawmakers.Conservative ireTrump is widely seen to have suffered politically more than Democrats over the previous shutdown fight.But he also needs to assuage conservatives livid that the president retreated from his wall-funding demand, a longtime campaign pledge.”This bill must NOT be signed by @realDonaldTrump,” tweeted Fox News host Laura Ingraham, warning it would serve as a “stimulus” for illegal immigration in part because it puts limits on law enforcement’s ability to deport some undocumented immigrants.The bipartisan spending measure, negotiated for weeks, notably does not contain the word “wall” in its 1,165 pages, instead calling the structures physical barriers and pedestrian fencing.last_img read more


Erdogan loses hold over Turkish capital


first_imgRecep Tayyip ErdoganTurkey’s Tayyip Erdogan suffered a severe setback as his ruling AK Party lost control of the capital Ankara for the first time in a local election and he appeared to concede defeat in the country’s largest city, Istanbul.Erdogan, who has dominated Turkish politics since coming to power 16 years ago and ruled his country with an ever tighter grip, campaigned relentlessly for two months ahead of Sunday’s vote, which he described as a “matter of survival” for Turkey.But the president’s daily rallies and overwhelmingly supportive media coverage failed to win over the country’s capital or secure a definitive result in Istanbul, as Turkey’s economic downturn weighed heavily on voters.Turkish broadcasters said opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) candidate Mansur Yavas had won a clear victory in Ankara, but the vote count in Istanbul was so tight that both parties declared the narrowest of victories.”The people have voted in favour of democracy, they have chosen democracy,” opposition leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu said, declaring that his secularist Republican People’s Party (CHP) had taken Ankara and Istanbul from the AK Party and held its Aegean coastal stronghold of Izmir, Turkey’s third largest city,Defeat for Erdogan’s Islamist-rooted party in Ankara was a significant blow for the president. Losing Istanbul, where he launched his political career and served as mayor in the 1990s, would be an even greater symbolic shock and a broader sign of dwindling support.State-owned Anadolu Agency said the AKP would appeal in some districts of the capital.In Istanbul, the AK Party said former prime minister Binali Yildirim defeated his CHP rival Ekrem Imamoglu by a mere 4,000 votes – with both candidates polling more than 4 million votes. Imamoglu said he had a lead of 28,000 with only 2,000 votes uncounted.In a speech to supporters in Ankara, Erdogan appeared to accept AKP defeat in Istanbul, although he maintained that most neighbourhoods in the city were held by his party. “Even if our people gave away the mayorship, they gave the districts to the AK Party,” he said.The party would appeal results wherever needed, he added.Turning a PageErdogan pledged that Turkey would now focus on its troubled economy in the run-up to national elections in 2023. “We have a long period ahead where we will carry out economic reforms without compromising on the rules of the free-market economy,” he told reporters.Turkey’s most prominent leader since the founder of the Turkish republic Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Erdogan’s support has been based on strong economic growth and backing from a core constituency of pious, conservative Muslim Turks.A consummate campaigner, he has been the country’s most popular – although divisive – modern politician, tightening his grip in elections last year that ushered in a powerful executive presidency, approved in a bitter 2017 referendum which alarmed Western allies who fear growing authoritarianism in Turkey.But a currency crisis after last year’s election dragged the lira down by 30 percent and tipped the economy towards recession. With inflation close to 20 percent and unemployment rising, some voters appeared ready to punish the president.”Today’s elections are as historic as that of 1994,” prominent journalist Rusen Cakir tweeted, referring to the year Erdogan was elected mayor of Istanbul. “It is a declaration that a page that was opened 25 years ago is being turned.”As authorities again scrambled to shore up the lira over the past week, Erdogan cast the country’s economic woes as resulting from attacks by the West, saying Turkey would overcome its troubles and adding he was “the boss” of the economy.However Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of Teneo political risk advisers, said the AK Party had lost seven of the country’s 12 main cities, even without taking Istanbul into account.”It’s a bad night for the AK Party,” he said. “They have done very poorly in all the economic powerhouses of country. For a party which portrays itself as pro-business, it’s a huge issue.”The lira traded at 5.61 to the dollar after initial results came in, compared with 5.55 at Friday’s close and 5.65 in US trading hours later on Friday.In mainly Kurdish southeast Turkey, residents celebrated as the pro-Kurdish opposition Peoples Democratic Party (HDP) won back municipalities that authorities had taken over two years ago, accusing the HDP of terrorist links. The HDP denies links to the outlawed militant Kurdistan Workers’ Party.”They robbed us of our will and we overturned this,” Diyarbakir resident Abdullah Elmas said.last_img read more


UN warns of worsening humanitarian situation in Libya


first_imgUN warns of worsening humanitarian situation in LibyaFierce fighting for control of Libya’s capital that has already displaced tens of thousands of people threatens to bring a further worsening of humanitarian conditions, a senior UN official has warned.”As long as the situation continues, even if it just stagnates and continues like this, we can expect to see a continuing deterioration,” UN humanitarian coordinator for Libya Maria do Valle Ribeiro told AFP.Strongman Khalifa Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA) launched an offensive against Tripoli, the seat of the internationally recognised Government of National Accord (GNA), on 4 April.”When we see the use of air power, the indiscriminate shelling of densely populated areas, it is very difficult to be optimistic,” do Valle Ribeiro, who is also the deputy UN envoy to Libya, said late Sunday.She was speaking after air raids by the LNA on Tripoli on Saturday killed four people and wounded 20 others, according to the GNA.”We continue to call for a respect of civilians, we continue to call for humanitarian pauses and most of all we continue to hope that the situation can return to a more peaceful settlement of the crisis,” she said.The fighting has killed at least 278 people and wounded more than 1,300, according to a toll released Wednesday by the World Health Organization.It has also forced 41,000 people to flee combat areas around Tripoli, do Valle Ribeiro said, while many remain trapped and in need of humanitarian assistance.Migrants at riskAmong the most vulnerable are about 3,500 migrants and refugees held in detention centres near the combat zone who are at “risk”, the UN official said.She said that 800 considered most in danger had been evacuated, after the UN and rights groups said gunmen attacked a detention centre south of Tripoli last week.Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said several migrants and refugees were shot and wounded in the attack.Libya has been mired in chaos since the NATO-backed uprising that deposed and killed dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011.People smugglers have taken advantage of the lawlessness, ferrying mostly sub-Saharan Africans from Libyan shores to Europe.According to the International Organization for Migration some 6,000 migrants are held in official detention centres in Libya. Hundreds more are held by armed groups elsewhere in the war-hit country.On Sunday Pope Francis called for “humanitarian corridors” to be opened to evacuate them.The UN official also voiced concern over a breakdown in basic services, including electricity and water supplies, and said more relief funds were needed for Libya.”We appealed for an additional 10.2 million (dollars) which doesn’t cover all that we foresee… but it covers at least the essential response for the first three, four weeks,” she said.During the first week of fighting, she said, “over a million schoolbooks” that were stored in a warehouse of the ministry of education were destroyed when the compound was hit.”Symbolically, it says a lot about the impact of such strife and clashes on not just the immediate survival of people but on the future of Tripoli children.”last_img read more


Trump To Sign Executive Order On Offshore Drilling And Marine Sanctuaries


first_img Share Wyland/NOAA/APA shark swims off the coast of Midway Atoll on the northern edge of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument in Hawaii. The Trump administration plans to consider reversing the designation of some marine sanctuaries. Wyland/NOAA/APPresident Trump is set to sign an executive order Friday that aims to expand offshore drilling for oil and gas, and possibly reverse the designation of some marine sanctuaries. In a briefing with reporters at the White House Thursday night, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said, “This will cement our nation’s position as a global energy leader.”The order directs Zinke to review a five-year plan in which President Obama banned drilling in parts of the Pacific, Arctic, and Atlantic Oceans. Zinke said that will be a long process, and a complex one, acknowledging that not all areas have oil or gas, and not all coastal communities want offshore drilling. But he said revenue from offshore leasing had dropped by $15 billion during the Obama administration, with some of that due to the dropping price of oil, “but not all of it.” Zinke said 94 percent of the nation’s outer continental shelf is currently off limits for development of any kind.The oil and gas industry welcomed the move. In a statement, Jack Gerard of the American Petroleum Institute said expanding drilling in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico in particular “could create thousands of jobs and provide billions of dollars in government revenue.”Along the Atlantic coast, though, more than 100 cities and towns have passed resolutions against offshore drilling. In Kure Beach, N.C., Mayor Emilie Swearingen said tourism is the second largest industry in the state. “We don’t want the devastation from an oil spill,” she said. “It’s not whether it would happen, but when it would happen.”George Edwardson, president of the Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope, said his council may consider filing suit at some point to challenge an expansion of offshore drilling. “Most of our food comes from the ocean,” he said.Zinke told reporters the administration will not remove the “stringent environmental safeguards already in place.” He also said he was optimistic about the development of offshore wind energy.The Obama administration’s drilling bans will remain in place for now. But even if they are eventually rolled back, there are questions about how effective the executive order will be in spurring new drilling. The price of oil is relatively low, hovering at about $50 a barrel, and offshore drilling is an expensive endeavor, especially in places like the Arctic. When asked whether the administration had been approached by any companies interested in drilling in the Arctic, Zinke said, “No.”It’s also not clear whether the Trump administration can reverse a separate offshore drilling ban that Obama announced a month before leaving office. He used an obscure provision of the 1953 Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to issue what he called a permanent ban on offshore drilling in large parts of the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. Obama administration officials said at the time that the law had no provision to reverse such a ban. When asked about this, Zinke said only that “everything” is under review, and “whatever recommendation I make I’m sure we’ll have the legal authority to complete it.”The executive order also imposes a halt on designating or expanding any National Marine Sanctuary, unless the action “includes a timely, full accounting from the Department of the Interior of any energy or mineral resource potential in the designated area.” Zinke says the administration will have 180 days to review all such designations and expansions over the past decade. He likened this to another executive order this week that directs a review of national monuments on public lands.Last year Obama made headlines when he quadrupled the size of a marine sanctuary in Hawaii. He also created the Atlantic Ocean’s first marine monument, preserving roughly 130 miles of sea canyons and underwater mountains off New England.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more


European Leaders Answer Anger Over Irma Response In Caribbean


first_img Share @weatherchannel twitter handleThe powerful wind speeds of IrmaWrapping up a sweeping visit to the destroyed island of St. Martin, France’s president responded to anger that his government didn’t do enough to handle Hurricane Irma’s wrath and promised to evacuate residents of his country’s Caribbean territories and provide services and shelter for those who choose to stay.French President Emmanuel Macron outlined a plan to distribute drinking water, food and medical help using the islands’ radio stations and even megaphones, if necessary. He also said about half of the island’s mobile connectivity had been restored and all “essential communication” would be back by next week.“What we have seen today are people determined to rebuild and return to a normal life,” he said Tuesday in a press conference. “They are impatient for answers and some are very, very angry. The anger is legitimate because it is a result of the fear they have faced and of being very fatigued. It is certain that some want to leave, and we will help them in that effort.”He said France was bringing in air-conditioned tents so children can start classes again soon, and he said a center would be established by Monday to begin processing requests for financial help.Macron pledged to rebuild St. Martin as a “model” for withstanding future storms.“I don’t want to rebuild St. Martin as it was,” he said. “We have seen there are many homes that were built too precariously, with fragile infrastructure. The geography of the homes was not adapted to the risks.”Macron said the Category 5 hurricane killed 11 people in St. Martin, while another four people died on the Dutch side of the island, bringing the death toll in the Caribbean to at least 37.The visit came as residents tried to revive a sense of normalcy with small gestures like sharing radios and rescuing dogs.The Dutch Red Cross said more than 200 people were still listed as missing on St. Maarten, but with communications extremely spotty a week after the storm hit, it wasn’t clear how many were simply without cell service and power and unable to let friends and family know they survived. The organization said 90 percent of buildings on the Dutch territory were damaged and a third destroyed as Irma roared across the island it shares with French St. Martin.Yogesh Bodha, a jewelry store employee, said there was no response from European officials for two days and he hasn’t seen many changes since Dutch authorities arrived on St. Maarten.“They should’ve been more organized than they were,” he said. “We have not received any food or water. They say it’s on its way. Let’s see.”For Liseth Echevarría, who works as a bartender in St. Maarten, offering whatever she could to family, strangers and abandoned pets was helping her cope — and those around her were doing the same.The manager of a marina next door threw over a hose so Echevarría and her husband could have a semblance of an outdoor shower. He also offered them a temporary power connection from his generator so they could charge phones and listen to the sole radio station still broadcasting.“This is the only communication that St. Maarten has with the world right now,” she said.It was thanks to that radio station that she found out about a flight for all Latin Americans stuck in St. Maarten. She rushed to the airport with her brother, who was evacuating back to Colombia. As she dropped him off, Echevarría saw a Yorkshire terrier tied to a metal barricade, abandoned by a passenger fleeing the island and told they couldn’t bring pets on the plane.Echevarría scooped up the dog named Oliver and took him home to meet her three other dogs, including one rescued from a neighbor’s property. The neighbor fled with her son after the hurricane destroyed their home. There was nothing left of it other than jagged pieces of wood and a shower curtain covered in colorful butterflies tangled in a toppled tree.Echevarría’s husband, Lex Kools, a civil engineer, jumps over the fence every day to feed the other two dogs on the property.“They were attacking each other, they were so hungry,” he said.At Echevarria’s and Kools’ home, the couple fed relatives and the girlfriend and two children of Echevarria’s cousin, all of whom were staying with them.Near the front door, a large plastic table sagged under the weight of boxes of spaghetti and cookies, soup cans, chips, bags of almonds and macadamia nuts and rice. Underneath were dozens of bottles of water.The couple said they took the goods from a grocery store blown open during the storm.They said they had planned on buying the items, but no one was working at the store and they were running out of food and water. They looked at each other as they observed looting.“Do we do this as well?” Kools recalled thinking. “Everybody was just running inside. It was chaos.”Dozens of people stood in line for hours Tuesday waiting for flights, some of which never materialized.“We’ve been here since 7 a.m.,” said Rosa Vanderpool, an accountant who was trying to get her stepdaughter and 4-year-old step-granddaughter on a flight to Curacao.“We only have two days of food left,” she said. “We don’t know if there are any planes. We don’t know anything.”___Associated Press journalists Danica Coto reported this story in Philipsburg and AP writer Sylvie Corbet reported from Paris. AP writers Mike Corder in The Hague, The Netherlands, and Gregory Katz in London contributed to this report.___An earlier version of this report had an incorrect spelling for the Dutch side of the island.last_img read more